Residences at the John Marshall
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History of the John Marshall... a modern landmark
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Walk in the footsteps of Elvis Presley, Mary Tyler Moore, Elizabeth Taylor and Vincent Price, some of the many celebrity guests visiting the John Marshall Hotel throughout its long and prestigious history as a Richmond historic landmark.

When first opened in 1929, the John Marshall was the largest hotel in Virginia. It offered all the luxuries and modern conveniences of that time. The magnificent cathedral doorway and grand stairway of St. Genevieve marble led visitors up to the beautiful lobby decorated in gold and St. Genevieve marble.

The John Marshall offered nightly and extended accommodations for business and travel leisure. Many members of the Virginia General Assembly regularly stayed at the John Marshall for its convenient location within walking distance to the State Capitol. Many guests remember the John Marshall for the weddings, dances, balls, banquets and dinners it hosted. The Virginia Room was one of the largest ballrooms in Richmond and could accommodate up to 1,200 people. The Marshall Room was famous for its pale mint-green walls and mirrors surrounding the room. Other gathering spaces for special events include the Colony Room and the Dominion Room.

The hotel was named in honor of John Marshall, the longest serving Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Many historians consider John Marshall, who served as Chief Justice from 1801 to 1835, to be the father of the United States judicial system. John Marshall was born in 1755 in Fauquier County, Virginia. He moved to Richmond, Virginia in 1782 when he was elected to the state legislature. In 1790, John Marshall built his home in what is now downtown Richmond, Virginia. Located at 818 East Marshall Street, the Federal style brick house is home to a collection of furnishings and household items used by the Marshall family as well as artifacts from the late 18th and early 19th centuries.